Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorLópez Caneda, Eduardo Guillermo
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez Holguín, Socorro
dc.contributor.authorDoallo Pesado, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorCorral Varela, María Montserrat
dc.contributor.authorCadaveira Mahía, Fernando
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-05T11:09:21Z
dc.date.available2018-11-05T11:09:21Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationLópez-Caneda E; Rodríguez Holguín S; Corral M;, Doallo S; Cadaveira F (2014). Evolution of the binge drinking pattern in college students: Neurophysiological correlates. Alcohol, 48, 407-418.
dc.identifier.issn0741-8329
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10347/17681
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that alcohol impairs response inhibition and that adolescence is a critical period of neuromaturation where cognitive processes such as inhibitory control are still developing. In recent years, growing evidence has shown the negative consequences of alcohol binge drinking on the adolescent and young human brain. However, the effects of cessation of binge drinking on brain function remain unexplored. The objective of the present study was to examine brain activity during response execution and inhibition in young binge drinkers in relation to the progression of their drinking habits over time. Event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by a Go/NoGo task were recorded twice within a 2- year interval in 57 undergraduate students (25 controls, 22 binge drinkers, and 10 ex-binge drinkers) with no personal or family history of alcoholism or psychopathological disorders. The results showed that the amplitude of NoGo-P3 over the frontal region correlated with an earlier age of onset of regular drinking as well as with greater quantity and speed of alcohol consumption. Regression analysis showed that NoGo-P3 amplitude was significantly predicted by the speed of alcohol intake and the age of onset of regular drinking. The group comparisons showed that, after maintaining a binge drinking pattern for at least 2 years, binge drinkers displayed significantly larger NoGo-P3 amplitudes than controls, whereas ex-binge drinkers were in an intermediate position between the two other groups (with no significant differences with respect to controls or binge drinkers). These findings suggest that binge drinking in young people may impair the neural functioning related to inhibitory processes, and that the cessation of binge drinking may act as a brake on the neurophysiological impairments related to response inhibition
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was supported by grants from the Consellería de Educación e Ordenación Universitaria, Xunta de Galicia (CN 2012/024), the Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (PSI2011-22575) and the Ministerio de Sanidad y Política Social, Plan Nacional sobre Drogas (exp 2010/134).
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MICINN/ Plan Nacional de I+D+i 2008-2011/PSI2011-22575/ES/CONSUMO INTENSIVO INTERMINTENTE DE ALCOHOL (BINGE DRINKING): PREVALENCIA Y VALORACION NEUROCOGNITIVA EN JOVENES UNIVERSITARIOS. ESTUDIO DE SEGUIMIENTO
dc.rights© 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internacional
dc.subjectAlcohol
dc.subjectBinge drinking
dc.subjectAdolescence
dc.subjectInhibitory control
dc.subjectResponse inhibition
dc.subjectEvent-related potentials
dc.subjectConsumo intensivo de alcohol
dc.subjectAdolescencia
dc.subjectControl inhibitorio
dc.subjectInhibición de resposta
dc.subjectPotenciais evocados
dc.titleEvolution of the binge drinking pattern in college students: neuropsychological correlates
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.DOI10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.01.009
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.alcohol.2014.01.009
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion
dc.identifier.e-issn1873-6823
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela. Departamento de Psicoloxía Clínica e Psicobioloxía
dc.description.peerreviewedSI


Files in this item

application/pdf
Name: 2014_Alcohol_LopezCaneda_BD_Evolution.pdf
Size: 1.480 Mb
Format: PDF


Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record






Harvesters:Useful links:
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela | Teléfonos: +34 881 811 000 e +34 982 820 000 | Contact Us | Send Feedback