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dc.contributor.authorMartínez Barbosa, Ruth María
dc.contributor.authorSenra Rivera, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorFernández Rey, José
dc.contributor.authorMerino Madrid, Hipólito
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T15:49:48Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T15:49:48Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationMartínez, R.; Senra, C.; Fernández-Rey, J.; Merino, H. Sociotropy, Autonomy and Emotional Symptoms in Patients with Major Depression or Generalized Anxiety: The Mediating Role of Rumination and Immature Defenses. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5716
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10347/23452
dc.description.abstractThe relationships between dimensions of personality (sociotropy and autonomy), coping strategies (rumination: brooding and reflection subtypes, and immature defenses) and symptoms of depression and anxiety were explored in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). A total of 279 patients completed questionnaires including measures of personality dimensions, rumination, immature defenses, depression and anxiety. Our findings suggested that sociotropy and autonomy may be associated with both depressive and anxious symptoms in patients with MDD and with GAD. Multiple mediation analyses indicated that brooding always acted as a mediating link between personality vulnerabilities (sociotropy and autonomy) and depressive and anxiety symptoms, independently of the patient group. In addition, in patients with MDD and those with GAD, brooding and immature defenses functioned together by linking sociotropy and autonomy, respectively, with depressive symptoms. Our results also showed that, in patients with GAD, both types of rumination explained the relationship between sociotropy and autonomy and anxiety symptoms. Overall, our findings provided evidence of the transdiagnostic role of the brooding, linking the vulnerability of personality dimensions and emotional symptoms. They also indicated that reflection and immature defenses can operate in conjunction with brooding, depending on the type of vulnerability and emotional context
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rights© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
dc.rightsAtribución 4.0 Internacional
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSociotropy
dc.subjectAutonomy
dc.subjectRumination
dc.subjectImmature defenses
dc.subjectEmotional symptoms
dc.subjectMultiple mediation models
dc.titleSociotropy, Autonomy and Emotional Symptoms in Patients with Major Depression or Generalized Anxiety: The Mediating Role of Rumination and Immature Defenses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.DOI10.3390/ijerph17165716
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165716
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.identifier.e-issn1660-4601
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversidade de Santiago de Compostela. Departamento de Psicoloxía Clínica e Psicobioloxía
dc.description.peerreviewedSI


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© 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as  © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)





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